In Production – The Emu Bay Shale dig site (2012)

  • The Road to Emu Bay. Photo By Helen Kundicevic

    The Road to Emu Bay. Photo By Helen Kundicevic

  • On Location at Emu Bay Shale dig site. Photo By Helen Kundicevic

    On Location at Emu Bay Shale dig site. Photo By Helen Kundicevic

  • Splitting fossiliferous rock. Video Still. Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Splitting fossiliferous rock. Video Still. Cinematography by Erika Addis

  • Greg in the fossil pit. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Greg in the fossil pit. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

  • Shadowplay at the dig site. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Shadowplay at the dig site. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

  • Fossil through an eyeglass. Emu Bay. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Fossil through an eyeglass. Emu Bay. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

  • Cambrian rock strata. Emu Bay Shale dig site. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Cambrian rock strata. Emu Bay Shale dig site. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

  • Skylark chaser rests. Photo by Helen Kundicevic

    Skylark chaser rests. Photo by Helen Kundicevic

  • Fog rises above a lone tree. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

    Fog rises above a lone tree. (Video Still) Cinematography by Erika Addis

A research focus in the Topologies Documentary project is the investigation of past worlds and habitats in the fossil record, as a way of re-seeing and understanding concepts of deep time (the vastness of geological time in relation to human history), evolution and climate change. The research project involved Australian and UK fieldwork, data collection and documentary production during August to December 2012. This work involved working with a team of Australian and international palaeontologists and research scientists. Without the persistence of these scientists this material – keys to understanding the deep past and evolutionary change – would lie unknown.

Production Begins

During September 2012 video production began on the Topologies Documentary Project with the collection of time critical data (interviews, video and sound recordings, photography) at the Emu Bay Shale site at Kangaroo Island, South Australia. This site is the richest “Burgess Shale-type” biota in Australia and is over 500 million years old.

The Emu Bay Shale site has international research significance and the Emu Bay Shale project was originally funded by a Linkage Grant from the ARC (2007-2009).

Scientific Fieldwork is currently supported by National Geographic. Arthropod descriptions are conducted with John Paterson (Uni of New England) and Diego Gardcis Bellido (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientficicas, Spain).

Dr Greg Edgecombe is a research scientist on the project.

Project research has been published in Nature: The International Weekly Journal of Science.

Research for the Topologies Documentary Project was developed and produced with the consultation and participation of palaeontologist, Dr Greg Edgecombe, Research Leader, at the Natural History Museum in the UK

Production Team
  • Cathie Payne

  • Producer / Director / Sound

  • Erika Addis

  • DOP / Cinematographer

  • Helen Kundicevic

  • Photography

  • Glenn Muir

  • Production Assistance / Boom /Driver /Bucket carrier / Skylark Chaser